Living Streets Scotland has submitted a robust call for car-free pavements - with no loopholes - in evidence to the Scottish Parliament’s Rural Economy and Connectivity Committee (RECC).

The Transport (Scotland) Bill (June 2018) set out plans to introduce a national ban on pavement and double parking to make it easier for local authorities to ensure pavements and roads are safer and more accessible to all.

The RECC is currently scrutinising the legislation following the consultation period. Living Streets Scotland will be giving further evidence to the RECC on 7 November. 

Pupils at St Hanleys celebrate with Strider

Stuart Hay, Director, Living Streets Scotland comments:

“Plans to outlaw footway parking should be supported by MSPs from all parties that care about people with disabilities, older people, parents and children.

“A national ban sends a clear message that pavements are for people. And people using our streets should be able to do so safely without being inconvenienced or endangered by parked cars forcing them off the pavement and into the road.

“On some streets it might be necessary to permit some degree of footway parking via exemptions from the national ban. This must always protect people using wheelchairs, those living with sight loss, and vulnerable pedestrians including children and older people. We will vigorously oppose any move by local authorities to widen the scope for exemptions.

“We have concerns that exceptions for public service vehicles, such as bin trucks, will be abused. The suggested 20 minute dispensation offered to deliveries should either be removed or substantially amended. Under no circumstances should delivery drivers be allowed to obstruct or damage pavements. It is vital this loophole is addressed to ensure our streets are safe and accessible for all.”

Living Streets submission to the consultation - pdf

People using our streets should be able to do so safely without being inconvenienced or endangered by parked cars forcing them off the pavement and into the road. We will vigorously oppose any move by local authorities to widen the scope for exemptions.

Stuart Hay, Director, Living Streets Scotland