Commenting on the launch of Scotland’s Road Safety Framework to 2030, Stuart Hay, Director of Living Streets Scotland, said:

“It is right that the Scottish Government has raised road safety up the agenda. People have become immune to the daily toll of tragedy on our roads. It’s time that reducing road casualties is treated as a health emergency given 168 people were killed and 2,001 people were seriously injured in 2019.

“Pedestrians represent the second-largest category of people killed and seriously injured by mode of transport (27% and 24% respectively) after car users, and it is sad to see progress in reducing deaths stalling. We hope to see renewed focus on pedestrian safety as this is urgently needed.

“Living Streets Scotland will be looking for decisive action in the final framework, including a commitment to properly enforced 20mph limits on all urban streets, and a commitment to reducing overall levels of traffic. We also need to see more funding for local authority transport departments who are struggling under austerity. Currently, only £100m is spent at national and local level to prevent deaths and serious injuries on the roads, which does not reflect the £1bn that is needed for proper road safety. The ultimate goal is ending the emotional trauma and grief of over 2000 families scarred by road accidents on Scotland’s roads. Many of the solutions are within reach to end this health emergency.”

Walking

Pedestrians represent the second-largest category of people killed and seriously injured by mode of transport (27% and 24% respectively) after car users, and it is sad to see progress in reducing deaths stalling. We hope to see renewed focus on pedestrian safety as this is urgently needed.

Stuart Hay, Director of Living Streets Scotland